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WHY SHOULD YOU GET A PRE-LISTING HOME INSPECTION?

A pre-listing home inspection can uncover previously unknown problems – major and minor – allowing your sellers the opportunity to make repairs, updates or replacements as needed or as they wish.

By addressing issues before the home goes on the market, you can list a home with greater confidence about its condition. This can mean cleaner offers and a smoother transaction for both parties. And a home in better condition will normally sell for more than one with problems that could have been corrected.

Homes that are already on the market can be at a disadvantage if problems are revealed during a subsequent home inspection. Issues that you and the seller were previously unaware of could keep a property from selling at its highest potential price, when it’s too late to address them.

The Pillar To Post Home Inspection includes a comprehensive report, complete with photos, printed on-site so there’s no waiting for results. With this valuable information in hand, your sellers can decide on next steps prior to listing. In the end, having well-informed sellers and buyers will work to everyone’s advantage, including yours.

CARBON MONOXIDE: A DEADLY DANGER!

Here in the middle of winter, it’s worthwhile to address a potential hazard caused by fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, water heaters and stoves: carbon monoxide (CO). These items are designed to vent CO to the outside, but harmful interior levels of CO can result from incomplete combustion, improper installation, or blockages, leaks or cracks in the venting systems. Very high levels of CO can lead to incapacitation or death, with victims sometimes never having been aware they were being poisoned.

Homeowners can take action against potential carbon monoxide poisoning by taking the following steps:

  • Never use a gas stove or oven to heat the home, even temporarily.
  • Have all fuel-burning appliances professionally inspected annually.
  • These appliances include gas stoves and ovens, furnaces and heaters, fireplaces, water heaters and gas clothes dryers.
  • All such devices should be properly installed and vented to the outside.
  • If repairs are necessary, have them performed by a qualified technician.
  • Do not start a vehicle in a closed garage, or idle the engine in the garage even when the garage door is open.
  • Never use gasoline-powered generators or charcoal grills indoors.
  • Install a CO detector (either battery operated, hard wired or plug-in) and learn what to do if the alarm activates.
  • If anyone in the home experiences fatigue, dizziness, blurred vision, nausea, or confusion, everyone should leave immediately and seek medical attention. If no symptoms are felt, open doors and windows immediately and shut off all fuel-burning devices that may be potential sources of CO.
  • Installation of working CO detectors in residential properties is now required by law in most Canadian provinces.

Stay safe and enjoy the comfort of home this winter and all year long.

JANUARY IS RADON ACTION MONTH

Prolonged exposure to unsafe levels of radon increases the risk of lung cancer; in fact, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking, and can cause cancers in pets as well. Any home can have a radon problem – old or new, well-sealed or draft, with or without a basement. An estimated 1 in 6 home in the U.S. is affected by radon.

WHAT IS RADON?

Radon is a naturally occurring odorless, colorless, radioactive gas formed by the ongoing decay of uranium in soil, rocks, sediments, and even well or ground water. While radon that escapes into the atmosphere isn’t harmful, dangerously high concentrations can build up indoors, exposing occupants to possible health risks.

HOW DOES RADON GET INTO A HOME?

Openings or cracks in basement walls, foundations or floors are common avenues. Sumps, basement drains, and spaces between gas or water fittings can also allow radon into the structure. Other possible entry points include gaps in suspended floors and cavities within walls.

HOW CAN I MAKE SURE MY CLIENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES AREN’T AT RISK?

We encourage homeowners to add radon testing to the home inspection process. Your Pillar To Post Home Inspector will set up monitoring equipment and report on the results. If an elevated level of radon is detected, steps can be taken to reduce the concentration to or below acceptable levels inside virtually any home. These can include a relatively simple setup such as a collection system with a radon vent pipe, which prevents radon from entering the home in the first place. Professional mitigation services can provide solutions for a home’s specific conditions.

Request radon testing when you book your next home inspection with Pillar To Post Home Inspectors.

CARBON MONOXIDE: POTENTIAL HAZARD

Man sitting with daughter

With winter coming on to cool much of North America, it’s worthwhile to address a potential hazard that arises with increased use of fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces and water heaters: carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas produced by the combustion of fuels such as natural gas, oil, and propane in devices including furnaces, water heaters, and stoves. These items are designed to vent the CO to the outside, but harmful interior levels of CO can result from incomplete combustion of fuel, improper installation, or blockages, leaks or cracks in the venting systems. Very high levels of CO can lead to incapacitation or death, with victims sometimes never having been aware they were being poisoned.

Homeowners can take action against potential carbon monoxide poisoning by taking the following steps:

  • Never use a gas stove or oven to heat the home, even temporarily.
  • Have all fuel-burning appliances professionally inspected annually, preferably before the start of the cold weather season when heaters and furnaces are first used.
  • These appliances include gas stoves and ovens, furnaces and heaters, water heaters and gas clothes dryers.
  • All such devices should be properly installed and vented to the outside.
  • If repairs are necessary, have them performed by a qualified technician.
  • Always use the proper fuel specified for the device.
  • Have flues and chimneys for gas fireplaces inspected regularly for cracks, leaks, and blockages that may allow a buildup of CO to occur.
  • Do not start a vehicle in a closed garage or idle the engine in the garage even when the garage door is open.
  • Gasoline-powered generators and charcoal grills must never be used indoors.
  • Purchase a CO detector (either battery operated, hard wired or plug-in) and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for proper location and installation.
  • Installation of working CO detectors in residential properties is now required by law in most states.
  • Learn what to do if the CO alarm activates. If anyone in the home experiences symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, blurred vision, nausea, or confusion, everyone should leave immediately and seek medical attention. If no symptoms are felt, open doors and windows immediately and shut off all fuel-burning devices that may be potential sources of CO.

Enjoy the comfort and safety of home this winter and all year long.